Sprain

Happens quickly: Twisting

Sprain - causes, symptoms, therapy - Sprain - causes, symptoms, therapy

What is a sprain (distortion)?

Sprains are one of the most common painful sports injuries. It occurs when the joint capsule or the surrounding ligaments and muscles are excessively overstretched due to an unfavourable movement. This often leads to bleeding, swelling and small cracks in these structures.

 Usually, treating sprains is uncomplicated. The pain usually subsides by itself, and the joint is fully resilient again – as soon as the sprain has healed up, and there are no more serious concomitant injuries.

 In some cases, ligament, capsule or muscle injuries caused by sprains can lead to chronic joint instability. To avoid this, you should consider the following aspects.

Chronic joint instability

Chronic ligament instabilities can lead to severe wear and tear of the cartilage in the joint and to arthrosis. Therefore, even in the case of an apparently harmless sprain, a visit to an orthopaedist or sports doctor is recommended.

Causes – how do sprains develop?

In sprains, the physiological, i.e., the natural range of motion of a joint is exceeded due to external forces. This excessive movement within a joint – usually triggered suddenly – can cause injuries to the structures stabilising the joint. 

Symptoms and signs – how to recognise sprains?

These are the signs of sprain:

  • Pain
  • Joint swelling
  • Bruise
  • Limited range of movement at the joint

If you experience these signs, you should consult a GP, sports doctor or orthopaedist to rule out more serious injuries such as torn ligaments or broken bones.

Risk factors for sprains

Risk factors for sprains - Risk factors for sprains

 

Some people have weak ligaments and tend to get sprains more than others. People with hollow foot, delayed muscle reaction time or muscle weakness are also more frequently affected.

Sprains can happen quickly, especially during exercise: Sprains often occur when playing basketball, jogging on uneven ground or playing football. Thumb and finger joints, for example, can be jammed when playing handball, volleyball or skiing.

Another classic is the sprained toe: when you walk barefoot and get caught on a piece of furniture or a half-opened door.

Prevention of sports injuries

If your ankle joint is unstable (possibly due to previous injuries or a loose ligamentous apparatus), sprains due to twisting may occur more easily.

It makes sense here to use a bandage (e.g. from the range of medi Levamed ankle supports).

In case of corresponding discomforts in the wrist, products from the medi Manumed range can be used as support.

Another tip: Always make sure that your footwear is sturdy and suitable for its purpose. This applies to sports and leisure activities as well as in everyday life.

Sprains - what to do? Therapy according to the RICE rule

If the ankle joint or any other part of the body is sprained, the RICE rule is a good guide for initial measures:

R = Rest

I = Ice (cooling)

C = Compression

E = Elevation

Rest: When a sprain occurs, you should stop your physical activity immediately. The affected part of the body should be immobilised and no longer be put under strain.

Ice: Start cooling the affected joint immediately. This counteracts the swelling. In addition, cooling generally contributes to acute pain relief.

Compression: An elastic bandage wrapped around the joint with slight tension brings the necessary compression to the injured area. During the acute phase, it is best to combine the pressure dressing with a cool-pack, and later with a pain-relieving ointment. If medically necessary, the doctor can also prescribe a bandage made of compressive fabric to support the healing process. Depending on the severity of the injury, the doctor can include an orthosis (splint) in the therapy.

Elevation: The last step is to elevate the affected limbs.

Important note

  • Unless otherwise recommended by your doctor or therapist, please follow the frequency instructions indicated.
  • If discomforts occur during or after an exercise, please stop the exercise and consult your doctor or therapist.
  • Take your time and perform the exercises carefully.
  • Depending on the healing phase, you can perform the exercises with or without a strap. Please discuss the therapy plan

Please discuss the therapy plan with your doctor.

Exercise for coordination

Forward lunge

Starting position:

  • Legs shoulder width apart
  • Keep your back straight

Exercise:

  • Take a small lunge step forward with the affected leg
  • Keep centre of gravity in the centre of the body
  • Then return to the starting position
  • Pay attention to a straight leg axis

Frequency:

  • 3 sets x 15 repetitions

Side lunge

Starting position:

  • Legs shoulder width apart
  • Build up basic body tension

Exercise:

  • Use the affected leg to perform a medium lunge in the given directions
  • Always assume the starting position in between
  • Pay attention to a straight leg axis

Frequency:

  • 3 repetitions  

Note: Only do this exercise if you can perform the “Forward lunge” exercise without any problems

Knee raise

Starting position:

  • Open legs shoulder wide and bend slightly

Exercise:

  • Lift the unaffected leg from the ground and hold it briefly
  • Stabilising movement only from the knee and ankle joint
  • Pay attention to a straight leg axis
  • Keep upper body steady

Frequency:

  • 3 repetitions, each lasting 20 seconds

Knee raise with aids

Equipment:

  • Airex® Pad / alternatively: folded towel

Starting position:

  • Open legs shoulder wide and bend slightly

Exercise:

  • Raise the unaffected leg from the ground
  • Stabilising movement only from the knee and ankle joint
  • Pay attention to a straight leg axis and keep upper body steady

Frequency:

  • 3 repetitions, each lasting 20 seconds

Note: Only do this exercise if you can perform the “Knee raise” exercise without any problems

Jump

Starting position:

  • Legs shoulder width apart
  • Keep your back straight

Exercise:

  • Make a small jump forward with the affected leg
  • Land on one leg
  • Stabilise the landing position and hold it briefly
  • Pay attention to a straight leg axis

Frequency:

  • 10 repetitions

Note: Only do this exercise if you can perform the “Knee raise with aids” exercise without any problems

Strengthening exercises

Pulling your toes upwards

Starting position:

  • Put your hands behind your back as support
  • Stretch out the affected leg
  • Bend the unaffected leg

Exercise:

  • Pulling your toes upwards
  • Press the outside of the foot statically against a fixed object (e.g. against a wall or a door frame)
  • Change: Press the inside of the foot against a fixed object

Frequency:

  • 3 sets x 10 repetitions per side
  • Hold the position for 2-3 seconds

Pulling your toes upwards with aid

Equipment:

  • Thera Band®

Starting position:

  • Put your hands behind your back as support
  • Stretch out the affected leg
  • Bend the unaffected leg

Exercise:

  • Pulling your toes upwards
  • Put Thera Band® around the ball of your foot and keep tension
  • Turn ankle joint outwards
  • Then take up the initial situation
  • Change: Turn ankle joint inwards

Frequency:

  • 3 sets x 15 repetitions

Note: Only do this exercise if you can perform the “Pulling your toes upwards” exercise without any problems

Heel raise (sitting)

Starting position:

  • Sitting upright on the chair
  • Do not lean back on the chair
  • Place both feet on the ground

Exercise:

  • Apply light pressure to knees with the ball of your hand
  • Lift heels off the ground (max. 20 degrees)
  • Then take up the initial position

Frequency:

  • 3 sets x 15 repetitions
  • Hold the position for 1-2 seconds

Heel raise (standing)

Starting position:

  • Legs shoulder width apart
  • Keep the pelvic and torso axis stable
  • Place the ball of your foot on a stepper or alternatively on a stair step

Exercise:

  • Lifting and lowering the body using the ankle joint

Frequency:

  • 3 sets x 15 repetitions

Note: Only do this exercise if you can perform the “Heel raise (sitting)” exercise without any problems 

Exercises for mobilisation

Roll (on the exercise ball)

Equipment:

  • Exercise ball

Starting position:

  • Sit up straight on the exercise ball
  • Place both feet on the ground
  • Keep your back straight
  • Place hands flat on the knees

Exercise:

  • Sitting on the exercise ball, roll forward and back slowly (max. 20 degrees)

Frequency:

  • 3 sets x 15 repetitions

Pressure exercise

Starting position:

  • Sitting upright on the chair
  • Do not lean back on the chair
  • Place both feet on the ground
  • Put a towel under your feet

Exercise:

  • Slowly push the towel back and forth with your feet (max. 20 degrees)

Frequency:

  • 3 sets x 15 repetitions

medi products for sprains

The M.step by medi is a rigid half-shell and stabilises the joint very well in combination with the shoe.

Find out more about M.step orthosis by medi here.

The latest ankle product from medi is the Levamed stabili-tri: The Levamed stabili-tri is a modular ankle orthosis that can adapt in a flexible way to the healing process and thus enables functional (phase-specific) care. In the acute phase, it immobilises the joint; at the beginning of physiotherapy, the stability can be reduced step by step. This provides the foot with sufficient support for a secure and fast mobilisation.

Find out more about Levamed stabili-tri here.

The human body

Ankle joint

Complex movements in the foot

Ankle joint

Product tip

Ankle supports from medi

Protect and stabilise the ankle joint

Ankle supports

Subscribe to newsletter

Further information about health and well-being in your free medi post newsletter

Subscribe

Rate this Content

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rate
 
 
 
 
 
 
0 Rates
0 %
1
5
0